Click to Home
Go To Search
Find Us on
Revolutionary War
            

 MADISON HISTORIC CEMETERIES
       
             
Our Known
Revolutionary War Veterans
            
 
           


American War of Independence
Madison has two known veterans of the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783), the rebellion of thirteen of the North American colonies of Great Britain.  Along with her sister states, Georgia declared herself independent in the Continental Congress of July 1776, forming the United States of America. 

At the time of the Revolutionary War, the lands of Madison, Georgia, where part of the Creek Nation.  However, veterans were among the earliest settlers and land recipients.

Revolutionary War Flags
We seek accuracy and real history!  For updates and corrections, please contact: Email


THOMAS NORRIS

Thomas Norris, was born in Harford County, Maryland, January 23, 1756, to John Norris and Susannah Bradford.  At the time of his birth, the Norris family had been in Maryland for over 125 years.  He was educated in Baltimore, and at the time of the Revolution, still resided in Maryland.  Thomas (age 20) and his brother, John, enlisted and served as Privates in the militia under Col. William Smallwood and Capt. John H. Stone, in the 1st Company, Maryland Regiment. 

Following his service William married fellow Harford County native, Sarah Ann Billingsley (1767-<1827, daughter of Francis Billingsley and Asenath Howell) about 1782-83 in Harford, Maryland.  Thomas migrated to Wilkes County, Georgia, near the end of 1786, becoming a land owner and slave holder similar to his brother, Alexander, and his father-in-law, both of whom followed Norris south within a few years.  
                        
Rogers House_179 E. Jefferson St.Thomas and Sarah had twelve children, with all but the eldest born in Georgia.  According to family history, he was an old line Whig, a Methodist, and a Mason.  Like many Madisonians, Norris’ farm land was in Morgan County while he lived in town and earned a living elsewise, as an attorney and in manufacturing concerns.  In 1817, Norris purchased the Rogers House (picture: Rogers House Museum, 179 E. Jefferson Street) on original Town Lot #6 in 1817 for $1,250.  He died without a will the next year (age 62), leaving his eldest son, Alexander, his heir by law.  Sarah continued to live in their home until 1824, thereafter relocating to Dallas County, Alabama, with her son, John and his family.  
                        
Norris_Thomas_DAR_SM.jpgIn Old Cemetery, the cluster of gravestones (Allen and Ogilby families) surrounding Thomas Norris represents four generations of his family.  In 1929, his gravestone was embellished with a bronze NSSAR medallion (picture: Adelaide Ponder (age 4), at the Norris gravestone, by her mother, Mrs. James Douglas Wallace, Chapter Regent, 1929).

           
           
[Synopsis and excerpts from biography compiled by Jan Manos, National Society Daughters of the Revolution (4/2015)]
              

(back to top

  Gravestone_Thomas Norris

Gravestone, TNorris (2015)
Old Madison Cemetery
Section D, Row 3

             
Revolutionary War
PVT 1st MD REGT
1756-1818
[001]
           

Related History Links
            
            
Henry Walton Chapter NSDAR

Morgan County, GA
Revolutionary War Veterans

           
American Revolutionary War, Maryland 400

       
           






           




           
        
           



        
       
WILLIAM PEARMAN, JR.

William Pearman, Jr., was born in Halifax County, Virginia, before 1760, to William Pearman, Sr., and his wife Ann.  The Pearman family had been there for a number of years as landowners, farmers, and slave holders.  William (age 18) enlisted February 11, 1778, and served as a Sergeant Privates under the commons of Capt. Philip Richard Francis Lee, Capt. John Peyton, and Col. William Heth, in the 3rd Company, Virginia Regiment. 

Following his service Thomas married fellow Halifax County native, Isabella Steward Weakley (1761-1820, daughter of Robert Weakley and Elinor Stewart) about 1782-83 in Harford, Maryland.  In 1786, William and perhaps two of his brothers migrated to Wilkes County, Georgia, and acquired a 237-acre tract at Beaverdam Creek.

William and Isabel had eight children, with the eldest two born in Virginia and the remainder in Wilkes County.  From 1787 until his death, William was a planter/farmer until his death in 1817 (age 57).  His eldest son, Robert, an attorney in Madison, administered the family lands and welcomed his mother to his home.  After Isabel's death, the family property in Wilkes County was sold.
                                         
Gravestone_Pearman_NEWIn Old Cemetery, William and Isabel are buried side by side with matching headstones and a remnant footstone.  In 1970, modern gravestones were installed, as the headstones had become nearly illegible.
                       
[Synopsis and excerpts from biography compiled by Jan Manos, National Society Daughters of the Revolution (4/2015)]             
                    
(back to top)
 
Gravestone_Pearman_Old    

Gravestone, WPearman2 (2015) 
Old Madison Cemetery
Section D, Row 2

 


Revolutionary War
 SGT 3rd VA REGT
1760-1817
[002]
           

Related History Links
            
            
Henry Walton Chapter NSDAR

Morgan County, GA
Revolutionary War Veterans